Paper Review: Linguistic Features to Identify Alzheimer’s Disease — Lucky’s Notes

October 26, 2017

Machine learning and artificial intelligence can be key tools in the future, to do identify people with early signs of Alzheimer’s Disease, and to perhaps start treatment early.  Common patterns of speech, can be identified for people affected by the disease when responding to a controlled group of questions using audio analysis.  This could be the start of something very significant in diagnosing Alzheimer’s in a cost effective manner.

Today I’m going to be sharing a paper I’ve been looking at, related to my research: “Linguistic Features Identify Alzheimer’s Disease in Narrative Speech” by Katie Fraser, Jed Meltzer, and my adviser Frank Rudzicz. The paper was published in 2016 in the Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease. It uses NLP to automatically diagnose patients with Alzheimer’s […]

via Paper Review: Linguistic Features to Identify Alzheimer’s Disease — Lucky’s Notes

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Steel Replaces Some Aluminium in Cars

October 16, 2017

After seeing aluminium in more and more cars in greater amounts, automobile manufacturers are swinging back to new lighter and stronger steel to replace the more expensive aluminium.  Fuel economy and lightness of the vehicles is still driving the innovations, but manufacturers have figured out how to use thinner steel while still maintaining its strength.

For the full article from the Wall Street Journal click below.

Steel Is Back in Style With Car Makers – WSJ

Bamboo bicycle – beautiful and functional

September 3, 2017

Imagine a handmade quality bicycle made with a bamboo frame.  The picture below shows a 2-speed cruiser, using a British step-back hub.  Each bamboo joint is glued and wrapped with 100 wraps of polycarbonate fiber reinforced tape.  Shown in the picture is Richard Harkness who made this bike with his own hands under the mentorship of someone who had made about 100 of these amazing bikes.  Notice the bamboo basket and the bamboo bike stand in the foreground.  The green rims complement the green bamboo beautifully.

Don’t try making this bike without a proper jig and under expert supervision; it is not an easy construction.  And by the way, it is not a cheap alternative to a standard bicycle, but it is unique and it is a conversation piece.  It is a work of art.

Bamboo Bike

 

Making Box Plots on Ti-84

August 15, 2017

Quick graphs on the Ti-84 is a good way to  see how data is distributed.  The attached document gives step by step instructions along with an example to practice.

Making a Box Plot on the TI 84

Hear Podcasts at Higher Speeds (3x?)

July 14, 2017

One way to increase you productivity, is to listen to podcasts at accelerated speeds.  A number of apps allow you the hear lectures and books at faster speeds enabling you to hear and process more information is less time, and increasing comprehension.  For full article, click below.

How Do Podcast Nuts Find the Time? They Listen at Chipmunk Speed – WSJ

Maybe It’s Okay to Eat Before Surgery

July 13, 2017

Not eating before surgery was long considered one of those “absolute” rules that was not debatable.  Now comes an article that tells us that in Europe carbohydrate-rich drinks before surgery are not only allowed, they lead to improved outcomes!  Who knew?  Less risk of infection and faster recovery are two positives, along with resultant cost savings.  Click below for full article.

Don_t Hold Fast to This Surgical Rule – WSJ

How to clear iPhone browsing data history

July 12, 2017

Clearing browsing history can help your smart phone run at optimal speeds.  Learn how to do it.

This  article talks about how to make sure your iPhone runs as efficiently as possible and discusses options for the changing screen and the battery, in addition to taking it to the Apple Store.

Keep Your iPhone Alive Until the New Ones Arrive – WSJ

Investment Decisions – Brains Vs. Computers; Which is Better?

June 13, 2017

The two points of view represented below are both well reasoned, conflicting, and cogent, but can they both be right?  The experts currently disagree, but maybe one day the question will be answered definitively.  For now, it makes for an interesting debate, and only time will tell who is right.  Today’s answer may not be tomorrow’s answer.

A key question is how much data does one need in order to make smart investment decisions.  Those who believe best decisions come from analyzing tons of data lean towards computer algorithms, while those who think smart evaluations don’t require looking at every piece of data lean toward human understanding and interpretation.

The term “quants,” refers to those quantitative analysts who crunch the number and are more reliant on computers and algorithms.

Why Brains Are More Reliable Than Machines – WSJ

Quants_ Best Strategy Is From the 17th Century – WSJ

VC Firms Use Big Data to Seek Out the Next Big Thing

April 25, 2017

Venture Capital firms, that is, firms that invest in funding start-ups, early stage  companies, and companies with good growth potential, are always on the hunt for the next great opportunity.  The article below talks about the trend away from people who are expert in spotting such opportunities, and towards computer based analytics which is believed to be faster and better at finding the “next big thing.”

Venture-Capital Firms Use Big Data to Seek Out the Next Big Thing – WSJ

 

Liberal Arts Become Mathematical

April 25, 2017

“Adding Math To Save Humanities” is the title of a sidebar article in the Wall Street Journal, April 25, 2017, about liberal arts colleges trying to add more mathematical contents to traditional liberal arts courses to better prepare their graduates for the work world.  Along with the Big Data revolution comes the need for employees in many diverse fields to be able to analyze data and to “rigorously and effectively” use data to answer questions.  “Emory University in Atlanta has created a degree that marries traditionally qualitative disciplines such as anthropology and English with math and statistics.”  This shift is in part to due students enrolling in liberal arts programs in smaller numbers.  Click below for the full article.

saving liberal arts